Free! We pay for what your insurance or other programs may not cover. LARC. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception. A Step Ahead Foundation of Middle Tennessee. Contact us today! 615-671-STEP (615-671-7837).


WE OFFER FOUR METHODS OF LARC

There are Four types of IUDs – ParaGard® and Mirena®

IUD FAQs

1. What is Intrauterine Contraception (IUD)?
Intrauterine Contraception, or IUC (sometimes referred to as the intrauterine device or IUD), is a small T-shaped device made of soft, flexible plastic. Two types are available in the U.S.:

ParaGard® Intrauterine Copper Contraceptive: Also knows the Copper T IUD, it is made with copper and plastic and prevents pregnancy by blocking sperm from meeting with and fertilizing an egg.

Mirena® Intrauterine System (IUS): Like the ParaGard®, the Mirena® IUS works by stopping the sperm from meeting with and fertilizing an egg. The Mirena® IUS also prevents pregnancy by releasing a small amount of progestin (a hormone found in birth control pills) that keep the ovaries from releasing an egg. Hormones are chemicals that control how different parts of your body work.

2. How do I use it?
An IUD is placed into the uterus by a health care provider. The ParaGard® IUD will prevent pregnancy right away. It may take a week for the Mirena® IUS to begin working, so ask if you need to use a back-up method of birth control (like a condom)in the meantime.

Once in place, either device will work well in preventing pregnancy for a very long time. ParaGard® IUDs are effective for 10 years or more, while the Mirena® IUS will last at least five years.

Your health care provider will have you return to the office or clinic from time-to-time for check-ups, just to make sure you are doing okay.

It is common for women to have some mild discomfort, cramping, and spotting after the IUD is first inserted. In most cases, though, this will become milder or go away in a few weeks or months. Your provider may also want you to check the IUD on your own between visits to make sure the string is in place.

Very rarely, an IUD will slip out of place. This is more common in women who have never had a baby. If the IUD moves or comes out, do not try to put it back in yourself! Go to the clinic and have them insert it for you.

3. How effective is it?
Of 100 women who use either the ParaGard® IUD or Mirena® IUS, about one will become pregnant.

4. Does the IUD protect against STIs and STDs?
The only method of birth control that protects against sexually transmitted infections is the condom.


There is one type of Implant – Nexplanon®

IMPLANT FAQs

1. What are implantable rods (implants)?
An implantable rod, or implant, is a thin plastic rod (about the size of a matchstick) that is placed under the skin of the upper arm. The implant releases a hormone found in birth control pills, progestin, that prevents pregnancy by causing the cervical mucus to thicken, which blocks sperm from meeting with and fertilizing an egg. It also works by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs.

2. How do I use it?
Placing the rod under the skin of the arm is a simple procedure done by a health care provider. It is done in the office and only takes a few minutes. It may take a week for the implant to begin working, so ask if you need to use a backup method of birth control (like a condom) in the meantime.

The implant will work by preventing pregnancy for three years. A health care provider can easily remove the old implant and put a new one in place when at the right time. The rod can also be taken out anytime if you decide you want to get pregnant.

It is common for women to have bleeding (especially in the first few months) and changes to their periods with an implant. Some women have heavier periods, but for most women, periods will become lighter or stop altogether.

Less often, women who have an implant may experience acne, weight gain, mood changes, headaches, and breast tenderness. Ask your health care provider what to expect, and what types of symptoms (like severe discomfort) you should let them know about.

3. How effective is it?
Of 100 women using implants, only about one will become pregnant. An implant is effective in preventing pregnancy for 3 years.

4. Does the implant protect against STIs and STDs?
The only method of birth control that protects against sexually transmitted infections is the condom.


Health and Human Services , Office on Women's Health logo
Our primary fact sources are original materials/facts from the:
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.hhs.gov/

Office on Women’s Health , U.S. Department of Health and Human Services